Best answers to tough interview questions

by Admin

Tags: interview job Myanmar

1.Which of the jobs you have held you liked least?

The interviewer is trying to trip you up. It is likely that your work experience contained a certain amount of repetition and drudgery, as all early jobs in the business world do. So, beware of saying that you hated a particular job ‘because it was boring’. Avoid the negative and say something along these lines: ‘All of my jobs had their good and bad points, but I’ve always found that if you want to learn, there’s plenty to be picked up every day. Each experience was valuable’. Then describe a seemingly boring job, but show how it taught you valuable lessons or helped you hone different aspects of your personality profile.


2.What university did you attend and why did you choose it?

The university you attended isn’t as important as your reasons for choosing it – the question is trying to examine your reasoning processes. Emphasize that it was your choice and that you didn’t go there as a result of your parents’ desires or because generations of your family have always gone there. Focus on the practical. ‘ I went to X University in London – it was a choice based on practicality. I wanted a university that would give me a good education and prepare me for the real world. It has a good record for turning out students fully prepared to take on responsibilities in the real world. It is [ or isn’t] a big university, but/and it has certainly taught me some big lessons about the value of [ whatever personality values apply] in the real world of business.’

If the interviewer has a follow-up question about the role your parents played in selection of your college or university, be wary- he or she is plumbing your maturity. It is best to reply that the choice was yours, though you did seek the advice of your parents once you had made your selection and that they supported your decision.


3.Are you looking for a permanent or temporary job?

The interviewer wants reassurance that you are genuinely interested in the position and won’t disappear in a few months to pursue postgraduate studies in Paris. Try to go beyond saying simply ‘yes’. Explain why you want the job. You might say, ‘Of course, I am looking for a permanent job. I intend to make my career in this field and I want the opportunity to learn the business, face new challenges and learn from experienced professionals.’ You will also want to qualify the question with one of your own at the end of your answer: ‘Is this a permanent or a temporary position you are trying to fill?’ Don’t be scared to ask. The occasional unscrupulous employer will hire someone fresh out of college or university for a short period of time – say, for one particular project – and then let him or her go.


4.We have tried to hire people from your university before and they never seem to work out. What makes you different?

Here’s a stress question to test your poise and analytical skills. You can shout that, yes, of course you are different and can prove it. So far, though, all you know is that there was a problem, not what caused the problem. Respond this way: ‘First, may I ask you exactly what problems you’ve had with people from this background?’ Once you know what the problem is (if one really exists at all – it may just be a ploy to test your poise), then you can illustrate how you are different, but only then. Otherwise, you run the risk of your answer being interrupted with, ‘Well, that’s what everyone else said before I employed them. You haven’t shown me that you are different.’


5.I’d be interested to hear about some things you learnt at university that could be used on the job

While specific job – related courses could form part of your answer they cannot be all of it. The interviewer wants to hear about ‘real-world’ skills, so oblige by explaining what the experience of college taught you rather than a specific course. In other words, explain how the experience honed your relevant personality profiles. ‘Within my subject, I tried to pursue those courses that had most practical relevance, such as…. However, the greatest lessons I learnt were the importance of …..’ and then list your personality profile strengths.

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